These pictures are amazing yet terrifying….

pitchfork:

Barack and Michelle Obama’s letter to the late Chicago house originator Frankie Knuckles’ friends and family.

pitchfork:

Barack and Michelle Obama’s letter to the late Chicago house originator Frankie Knuckles’ friends and family.

ALL THE CUTENESS FOREVER

nprmusic:

Less than a week away, y’all. 

LETS DO THIS FOLKS.

nprmusic:

Less than a week away, y’all

LETS DO THIS FOLKS.

(via nprmusic)

WOW. Flavorpill getting all deep on us! 

But seriously, Audre Lorde was a cornerstone in womanist politics. Love that her message is still getting out there!

amazing….

(via greasercreatures)

RIP… what a great body of work.

nprmusic:

We’re launching a new R&B stream soon called I’ll Take You There and want you to party with us at the Ace Hotel on Feb. 12!
Follow @NPRandB on Twitter for more deets. 

The Negroclash DJs are reuniting for NPR Music’s launch of I’ll Take You There, our new R&B stream. I mean, could this be any better?

nprmusic:

We’re launching a new R&B stream soon called I’ll Take You There and want you to party with us at the Ace Hotel on Feb. 12!

Follow @NPRandB on Twitter for more deets. 

The Negroclash DJs are reuniting for NPR Music’s launch of I’ll Take You There, our new R&B stream. I mean, could this be any better?

THIS INTERVIEW IS OVERRRRRRR

(via kyssthis16)

*many tears*
oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

*many tears*

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

About
portrait
Images, ideas, bon mots and occasional fond musings.

Words are meaningless and forgettable.
-- Depeche Mode